HIV DOULA work

PUBLIC
ENGAGEMENT

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EXHIBITION  METANOIA: TRANSFORMATION THROUGH AIDS ARCHIVES AND ACTIVISM  March 11-April 29, 2019 LGBT Center, NYC   Metanoia was an archival examination of community-based responses to the ongoing AIDS crisis in the USA. “Metanoia”, a Greek word referring to the possibility for transformation, demonstrated that HIV/AIDS is a powerful agent of change and that transformation happens through community, activism, words, sex, care and the materials that document these human efforts.  “Metanoia” was displayed over three floors of The LGBT Center in NYC and was curated from   The Center Archive  ’s holdings, as well as those of the   ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at USC Libraries  . The show centered primarily on the contributions and experiences of Black women, who have always been at the forefront of movement work, but who are often found at the margins of AIDS archives, art shows and histories. Locating their words, images, stories and histories in these archives has been transformational for the curators and will be for audiences concerned with the ongoing impact of the AIDS crisis.  A print guide book was created for the closing event (available upon request), and an online guide book will be released Summer 2019.   Metanoia was curated by  Katherine Cheairs ,  Alexandra Juhasz ,  Theodore Kerr , and  Jawanza James Williams  for WWHIVDD.

EXHIBITION
METANOIA: TRANSFORMATION THROUGH AIDS ARCHIVES AND ACTIVISM
March 11-April 29, 2019
LGBT Center, NYC

Metanoia was an archival examination of community-based responses to the ongoing AIDS crisis in the USA. “Metanoia”, a Greek word referring to the possibility for transformation, demonstrated that HIV/AIDS is a powerful agent of change and that transformation happens through community, activism, words, sex, care and the materials that document these human efforts.

“Metanoia” was displayed over three floors of The LGBT Center in NYC and was curated from The Center Archive’s holdings, as well as those of the ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at USC Libraries. The show centered primarily on the contributions and experiences of Black women, who have always been at the forefront of movement work, but who are often found at the margins of AIDS archives, art shows and histories. Locating their words, images, stories and histories in these archives has been transformational for the curators and will be for audiences concerned with the ongoing impact of the AIDS crisis. A print guide book was created for the closing event (available upon request), and an online guide book will be released Summer 2019.

Metanoia was curated by Katherine Cheairs, Alexandra Juhasz, Theodore Kerr, and Jawanza James Williams for WWHIVDD.

EVENT   AIDS VIDEO ACTIVISM: WOMEN AND INCARCERATION, A VIDEO PROGRAM FOR "METANOIA"  6-8 pm, April 8, 2019 LGBT Center, NYC  Spanning several generations within the AIDS activist and related video movements, this series focused upon the stories, activism and struggles of women, particularly Black women and women of color, who organized and become activists around injustices facing incarcerated women. At the heart of these videos is a deeply feminist commitment to freedom and a linked understanding that those on the inside are part of life on the outside, even if structural and penal forces work to deny them these connections. Questions of faith, race, gender, sexuality, what-could-be and the weight of systemic violence on all people permeate the work.  The event featured the following films:   I’m You, You’re Me: Women Surviving Prison, Living with AIDS  Catherine Saalfield-Gund and Debra Levine, 1992, 28 mins   Blind Eye to Justice   Directed and Edited by Carol Leigh, Produced by Cynthia Chandler (Women’s Positive Legal Action Network/ Justice NOW), 1998, 35 mins   Digital Stories  From the Center/ Margaret Rhee, Isela Ford, and Allyse Gray, 2011, 15 mins  The screening was bookended by comments from  Deb Levine ,  Judy Greenspan  and  Carol Leigh , and followed by a panel discussion moderated by  Margaret Rhee  featuring  Catherine Saalfield-Gund ,  Isela Ford , and  Allyse Gray .    Documentation of the event is available upon request.   Programmed by  Katherine Cheairs  &  Alexandra Juhasz  for WWHIVDD.

EVENT
AIDS VIDEO ACTIVISM: WOMEN AND INCARCERATION, A VIDEO PROGRAM FOR "METANOIA"
6-8 pm, April 8, 2019
LGBT Center, NYC

Spanning several generations within the AIDS activist and related video movements, this series focused upon the stories, activism and struggles of women, particularly Black women and women of color, who organized and become activists around injustices facing incarcerated women. At the heart of these videos is a deeply feminist commitment to freedom and a linked understanding that those on the inside are part of life on the outside, even if structural and penal forces work to deny them these connections. Questions of faith, race, gender, sexuality, what-could-be and the weight of systemic violence on all people permeate the work.

The event featured the following films:

I’m You, You’re Me: Women Surviving Prison, Living with AIDS
Catherine Saalfield-Gund and Debra Levine, 1992, 28 mins

Blind Eye to Justice
Directed and Edited by Carol Leigh, Produced by Cynthia Chandler (Women’s Positive Legal Action Network/ Justice NOW), 1998, 35 mins

Digital Stories
From the Center/ Margaret Rhee, Isela Ford, and Allyse Gray, 2011, 15 mins

The screening was bookended by comments from Deb Levine, Judy Greenspan and Carol Leigh, and followed by a panel discussion moderated by Margaret Rhee featuring Catherine Saalfield-Gund, Isela Ford, and Allyse Gray.

Documentation of the event is available upon request.
Programmed by Katherine Cheairs & Alexandra Juhasz for WWHIVDD.

SERIES  UNEASY MEDICINE: AIDS PHARMACEUTICALS & OTHER WAYS OF CARING   October 2018 - July 2019 Abrons Arts Center  UNEASY MEDICINE, is an annual monthly series that uses documentary film and scholarly writing to consider HIV in relationship to the pharmaceutical industry, colonization, and forms of care that fall beyond biomedicine, with a particular focus on life outside the U.S. and Western Europe.Through a collective practice of knowledge sharing we will consider the following questions:  - How does the pharmaceutical industry craft profit from illness?  - What might happen if we honored, acknowledged and communicated the fact that drug discovery frequently draws from botanical knowledge drawn from indigenous peoples?  - How are western medicinal treatments combined and remixed with healing practices different from those recognized as effective by modern science?  - How can we form political alliances across practices of care to build better worlds together?  During film weeks, the film will be shown in session and discussed afterwards. During reading weeks, the readings will be completed at home and discussed collectively. Together we will create a welcoming space of wonder that can hold and explore a breadth of feelings, attitudes and awareness we may have around medicine of all sorts. We will consider ideas of health and treatment that include gratefulness, distrust, confusion, fatigue, joy, melancholy and unease (as well as those we may not have words for yet).   Readings are available upon request.   Poster by  Emilio Martinez Poppe : www.emilio.click Curated by  Shanti Avirgan ,  Nicholas D'Avella , and T heodore (ted) Kerr  for WWHIVDD

SERIES
UNEASY MEDICINE: AIDS PHARMACEUTICALS & OTHER WAYS OF CARING
October 2018 - July 2019
Abrons Arts Center

UNEASY MEDICINE, is an annual monthly series that uses documentary film and scholarly writing to consider HIV in relationship to the pharmaceutical industry, colonization, and forms of care that fall beyond biomedicine, with a particular focus on life outside the U.S. and Western Europe.Through a collective practice of knowledge sharing we will consider the following questions:

- How does the pharmaceutical industry craft profit from illness?

- What might happen if we honored, acknowledged and communicated the fact that drug discovery frequently draws from botanical knowledge drawn from indigenous peoples?

- How are western medicinal treatments combined and remixed with healing practices different from those recognized as effective by modern science?

- How can we form political alliances across practices of care to build better worlds together?

During film weeks, the film will be shown in session and discussed afterwards. During reading weeks, the readings will be completed at home and discussed collectively. Together we will create a welcoming space of wonder that can hold and explore a breadth of feelings, attitudes and awareness we may have around medicine of all sorts. We will consider ideas of health and treatment that include gratefulness, distrust, confusion, fatigue, joy, melancholy and unease (as well as those we may not have words for yet).

Readings are available upon request.
Poster by Emilio Martinez Poppe: www.emilio.click
Curated by Shanti Avirgan, Nicholas D'Avella, and Theodore (ted) Kerr for WWHIVDD

SCREENING  PAST PRESENT FUTURE: The Ongoing AIDS Epidemic in Four Documents   Jan 11, 2018 Union Docs  From the beginning of the AIDS epidemic in the US, production of moving images has been vital to the response. At this screening, at  Union Docs , four documents from various moments of the epidemic explored how ideas of activism, care, community, gender, history, identity, loss, race, representation and sexuality intersect within the epidemic, and continue to shape its effects to this day. Screened films:  Ending, Silence, Shame, Stigma: HIV/AIDS in the African American Family , Katherine Cheairs;  We Care: A Video for Care Providers of People Affected by AIDS , Women's AIDS Video Enterprise;  Villanelle , Hayat Hyatt;  Jawanza James Williams NYC Hearing Testimony , NYC.gov. The screening was followed by a panel discussion moderated by  Hari Ziyad  with  Katherine Cheairs ,  Alexandra Juhasz , and  Jawanza Williams .   Transcript of the discussion available upon request.   The event was curated by  Virgil Taylor  and  Theodore (ted) Kerr

SCREENING
PAST PRESENT FUTURE: The Ongoing AIDS Epidemic in Four Documents
Jan 11, 2018
Union Docs

From the beginning of the AIDS epidemic in the US, production of moving images has been vital to the response. At this screening, at Union Docs, four documents from various moments of the epidemic explored how ideas of activism, care, community, gender, history, identity, loss, race, representation and sexuality intersect within the epidemic, and continue to shape its effects to this day. Screened films: Ending, Silence, Shame, Stigma: HIV/AIDS in the African American Family, Katherine Cheairs; We Care: A Video for Care Providers of People Affected by AIDS, Women's AIDS Video Enterprise; Villanelle, Hayat Hyatt; Jawanza James Williams NYC Hearing Testimony, NYC.gov. The screening was followed by a panel discussion moderated by Hari Ziyad with Katherine Cheairs, Alexandra Juhasz, and Jawanza Williams.

Transcript of the discussion available upon request.

The event was curated by Virgil Taylor and Theodore (ted) Kerr

EVENT  A ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY DISCUSSION  June 9, 2018 Urb Arts  The inaugural St. Louis WWHIVDD discussion was an opportunity for the local community to talk about the relationships between art, social work, and public health, exploring the following question: - Where are the similarities across disciplines? The differences? - Where are the points of possible and established collaboration? - How do we define “care”? What does care look like in practice? - What are the ways that people use community, culture, and care to improve their own lives?  The discussion included voices from STL's social justice and HIV responding communities, as well as local artists, activists, care-givers and others.  The image is  Shabez Jamal , a self portrait from the  DuRags Succulents and Gold  series.

EVENT
A ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY DISCUSSION
June 9, 2018
Urb Arts

The inaugural St. Louis WWHIVDD discussion was an opportunity for the local community to talk about the relationships between art, social work, and public health, exploring the following question:
- Where are the similarities across disciplines? The differences?
- Where are the points of possible and established collaboration?
- How do we define “care”? What does care look like in practice?
- What are the ways that people use community, culture, and care to improve their own lives?

The discussion included voices from STL's social justice and HIV responding communities, as well as local artists, activists, care-givers and others.

The image is Shabez Jamal, a self portrait from the DuRags Succulents and Gold series.

EVENT   WHAT WOULD AN HIV-INFORMED CULTURE WORKER DO?   October 14, 2018 Triple Canopy  As part of a day long symposium entitled  How We Do Illness  connected to  Triple Canopy ’s  Risk Pool  issue, WWHIVDD co-hosted a public conversation that asked, How might cultural workers and institutions better equip themselves to meaningfully consider HIV/AIDS in exhibitions, films, texts, and performances?  The event was an open, informal, discussion in which members of the public, and cultural workers in particular, were invited to listen and to exchange ideas about how we can best reflect the intersectional legacy and lived reality of the ongoing response to HIV/AIDS.  The result was the creation of  Twenty-One Questions to Consider When Embarking on AIDS Related Cultural Production .

EVENT
WHAT WOULD AN HIV-INFORMED CULTURE WORKER DO?
October 14, 2018
Triple Canopy

As part of a day long symposium entitled How We Do Illness connected to Triple Canopy’s Risk Pool issue, WWHIVDD co-hosted a public conversation that asked, How might cultural workers and institutions better equip themselves to meaningfully consider HIV/AIDS in exhibitions, films, texts, and performances?

The event was an open, informal, discussion in which members of the public, and cultural workers in particular, were invited to listen and to exchange ideas about how we can best reflect the intersectional legacy and lived reality of the ongoing response to HIV/AIDS.

The result was the creation of Twenty-One Questions to Consider When Embarking on AIDS Related Cultural Production.

EVENT  WE DO NOT MOURN GEORGE  December 5, 2018 Various Locations  In the days following World AIDS Day / Day With(out) Art, once President of the United States,  George Bush , lied in State, and a national  Day of Mourning  was called. In response, members of WWHIVDD gathered to mourned our loved ones and members of other communities who died and suffered under Bush’s reign, including people living with HIV.  #ourdayofmourning

EVENT
WE DO NOT MOURN GEORGE
December 5, 2018
Various Locations

In the days following World AIDS Day / Day With(out) Art, once President of the United States, George Bush, lied in State, and a national Day of Mourning was called. In response, members of WWHIVDD gathered to mourned our loved ones and members of other communities who died and suffered under Bush’s reign, including people living with HIV. #ourdayofmourning

SCREENING   CONSENT: HIV Non-Disclosure and Sexual Assault Law  July 2017 The Copper Union   WWHIVDD worked with the  Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network  to co-host a screening of   Consent: HIV Non-Disclosure and Sexual Assault Law  , hosted at  The Copper Union . WWHIVDD prepared a guide to help facilitate questions.

SCREENING
CONSENT: HIV Non-Disclosure and Sexual Assault Law
July 2017
The Copper Union

WWHIVDD worked with the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network to co-host a screening of Consent: HIV Non-Disclosure and Sexual Assault Law, hosted at The Copper Union. WWHIVDD prepared a guide to help facilitate questions.

EVENT  MEETING WITH THE CANARIES   Fall 2016 Recess Art  As part of the  Canaries ’ residency at  Recess,  WWHIVDD had a chance to meet with the collective to talk about health, well being, living with illness, art, culture, creation and much more.

EVENT
MEETING WITH THE CANARIES
Fall 2016
Recess Art

As part of the Canaries’ residency at Recess, WWHIVDD had a chance to meet with the collective to talk about health, well being, living with illness, art, culture, creation and much more.

SERIES  WISH YOU WERE HERE: Holiday Card Letter Writing   Annually Various Locations   WISH YOU WERE HERE started off as a letter writing event in St. Louis for   Michael Johnson  , incarcerated under unjust HIV Criminalization laws;   Michael Brown  , who was murdered by police; and   Robert Rayford  , a 16 year old who died with HIV in 1969. In that tradition WWHIVDD partners annually with the   Sero Project   to write holiday cards to people incarcerated due to unjust HIV criminalization laws, across the USA.

SERIES
WISH YOU WERE HERE: Holiday Card Letter Writing
Annually
Various Locations

WISH YOU WERE HERE started off as a letter writing event in St. Louis for Michael Johnson, incarcerated under unjust HIV Criminalization laws; Michael Brown, who was murdered by police; and Robert Rayford, a 16 year old who died with HIV in 1969. In that tradition WWHIVDD partners annually with the Sero Project to write holiday cards to people incarcerated due to unjust HIV criminalization laws, across the USA.

SCREENING   ENDING SILENCE, SHAME & STIGMA: HIV/AIDS in the African American Family  Presented by Video Revival as part of the Theirs/ours/yours: Queer Art & Film Fest October 2017    Ending Silence  , a documentary produced, directed and edited by filmmaker, educator, and WWHIVDD member Katherine Cheairs acts as a catalyst for people to talk about the virus and the related impacts within our families and communities. The screening was followed by a discussion with the director, presented by WWHIVDD.

SCREENING
ENDING SILENCE, SHAME & STIGMA: HIV/AIDS in the African American Family
Presented by Video Revival as part of the Theirs/ours/yours: Queer Art & Film Fest
October 2017

Ending Silence, a documentary produced, directed and edited by filmmaker, educator, and WWHIVDD member Katherine Cheairs acts as a catalyst for people to talk about the virus and the related impacts within our families and communities. The screening was followed by a discussion with the director, presented by WWHIVDD.

ACTIVISM   ART AIDS AMERICA   Fall 2016 Bronx Museum   Inspired by the   Tacoma Action Collective   who protested the lack of meaningful Black inclusion within the Tacoma installation of   Art AIDS America  , WWHIVDD held a series of events around the Bronx installation of Art AIDS America. We hosted two community meetings that invited people to share their thoughts and feelings about the exhibition, and held two interventions within the exhibition, one in which we engaged visitors in conversation about what was present and lacking within the exhibition, and another intervention (inspired by  Julie Tolentino  and  Jawanza Williams ) in which we used our bodies to support the art and artists in the exhibition. In the photo above, WWHIVDD members create the image from the missing part of the diptych that was not included in the exhibition.  For more information, download our report:    How Do You Feel In This Place?   .  Photo:  Elijah C Stevens .

ACTIVISM
ART AIDS AMERICA
Fall 2016
Bronx Museum

Inspired by the Tacoma Action Collective who protested the lack of meaningful Black inclusion within the Tacoma installation of Art AIDS America, WWHIVDD held a series of events around the Bronx installation of Art AIDS America. We hosted two community meetings that invited people to share their thoughts and feelings about the exhibition, and held two interventions within the exhibition, one in which we engaged visitors in conversation about what was present and lacking within the exhibition, and another intervention (inspired by Julie Tolentino and Jawanza Williams) in which we used our bodies to support the art and artists in the exhibition. In the photo above, WWHIVDD members create the image from the missing part of the diptych that was not included in the exhibition. For more information, download our report: How Do You Feel In This Place?. Photo: Elijah C Stevens.